Archive for: Leeuwarden Workshop

Urban Hunting

19 May
May 19, 2016

Johanna Arco

A delicious probe into sharing economy, data and food hunting

All food that could be collected for free by Johanna within two hours on a Saturday morning in Leeuwarden centre is used for the creation of four dishes: a potato-chicory-gratin, a chicory-orange salad, a yoghurt sauce and a Gado Gado. Instead of representing data, Johanna decided to collect data herself and see what she can do with it within very limited time.

High sKale

19 May
May 19, 2016

Saskia Burghardt, Saibot Karlsson

Smoked kale is the key ingredient of these dishes, that are based on data about cannabis consumption by 15 to 16-year old kids in England (35% have tried cannabis), Italy (24%) and Sweden (8%). Three big joints are made with a filling representing the different countries: fish and chips, risotto, and pickled herring with boiled potatoes. To each of the fillings smoked kale is added according to the amount of pot smokers.

Fresh Pasta, Old People

19 May
May 19, 2016

Daan Bandringa, Anja Hertenberger, Franzi Michelmann

Red, green and black tagliatelle served for a meditation on an over-aged society

Using data in the form of the population pyramid of Dutch citizens in 1960, 2015 and 2050, a pasta graphics is created. The three colours represent the young (green), the not-so-young-anymore (red) and the old (black). In order to give a taste of the different age groups, the 1960’s pasta is topped with a meat sauce made with a prefab blend of spices by Knorr. The 2015 ‘back-to-basics’ pasta comes with Carbonara, and the pasta of the future is a mix of noodles and Wakame salad.

Food transit time

19 May
May 19, 2016

Didi Lehnhausen

Classic humus enriched with beetroot for a better understanding of your body

This dish both visualises data and enables its consumer to find out about the time that his/her body needs to digest and excrete the food.

The 8.8 metre line of humus represents the average length of a human intestine. Before eating the humus, each participant is provided with a plastic cup for collecting urine. The participant should write his/her name and the time of intake on the cup. When the urine turns reddish, the humus has been fully digested and the participant should note his/her personal time for digestion on the cup.