Archive for: Kosovo workshop on corruption

Soufflée au KEK

15 Mar
March 15, 2017

Thomas Levine, Elona Shatri

Kosovo runs on two power plants, of which the oldest, Kosovo A Power Station, is said to be the worst single-point source of pollution in Europe. Plans to build a cleaner and more efficient power plant date back to the early 2000s, but they have been altered along the way and construction was postponed constantly. Like its predecessors, the new plant, Kosovo C, would burn lignite, coal’s crumbly brown, toxic, poor cousin. For cleaner energy has gotten so much cheaper in recent years, building an eventually not-so-efficient and dirty new power plant instead of wind farms and solar panels seems absurd. The whole case is an unfathomable boscage of private and public interest, in which the soon-to-be-privatised Kosovo Energy Corporation (KEK), politicians, investors and the World Bank are entangled.

Soufflée au KEK depicts the absurdity of the situation in a data dish and a performance.

Three chocolate soufflées together with the three coffees represent the three power plants, existing Kosovo A and B and the future plant C.

The size of the soufflées is proportional to the power plants’ electricity production – and well, there is some difference, but not so much in the end.

The chocolate inside is proportional to the dust pollution, and that varies dramatically, since plant A is a massive polluter. But because they all run on coal or lignite, they all pollute – which you can see from the smoke produced by burning tea on the soufflées’ top.

The coffee-making performance follows a strict script, in which the two performers make contradictory statements about the three power plants.

Seeds of Courage

15 Mar
March 15, 2017

Arber Hajrizaj, Zana Sherifi

Can a simple muffin radiate hope? It can! These muffins are based on the same data as the Reports on the Rise dessert. In relation to reported cases of corruption, a mix of poppy, chia and other seeds is added to the dough. When presented next to each other, the increase of reports becomes obvious. You can also taste it clearly, when eating the muffins. The one with the most seeds – and hence the most healthy one – envisions a future, when every case is reported and prosecuted courageously, and Kosovo eventually turns into a corruption-free country.

(Un)employed Dollmas

15 Mar
March 15, 2017

Ernera Dushica, Qendresa Hoti

Kosovo is facing multiple economic and social problems, one of which is high unemployment. Two of the three Dollmas give an idea of the current employment situation of women in Kosovo. The last one envisions a better future.

All peppers are stuffed with the same ingredients, rice and minced meat, but in different proportions. In the ‘worst’ filling, rice dominates clearly. In addition, the pepper sits on a burned slice of tomato. This Dollma represents the extremely high unemployment rate among young women. In the second Dollma, the amount of rice is slightly reduced. Also carrot, parsley and some boiled vegetables are added, so the dish becomes slightly better. However, it tells that the majority of women in Kosovo don’t have a paid job. The ‘perfect’ Dollma represents a future situation, when the employment rate among women has reached 90 percent: It’s tasty, rich of meat and comes with a variety of healthy vegetables on the side.

Highway to Health

15 Mar
March 15, 2017

Ernera Dushica, Qendresa Hoti

This Falafel platter tells the true story of a relative who waited for an operation for two years and was finally operated within a week after bribing the hospital staff. The long waiting time is represented with falafel nuggets along with a sauce that gradually gets darker as more pesto is added to the sour cream: While there is hope in the beginning, this hope is lost on the way. The bribe itself can be experienced as a hot chilli and tomato sauce. After the bribe, when health is regained, a delicious and healthy looking Baba ganoush caters to your senses.

The Flija Choice

15 Mar
March 15, 2017

Mjellme Doli, Zana Sherifi

Flija is probably the most Albanian-Kosovar dish you can ever have. It’s not easy to make and takes a long time. Made simply out of flour, water, salt cream and pure cream, Flija is usually not spicy. But in this case some of the Flija is spiced with chili powder and red pepper.

The Flija Choice is a kind of game with food. Participants are offered two kinds of similarly looking Flija by the Flija Serving Officer. S/he asks the participants to report to the Flija Reporting Officer across the room, if they experience something unusual eating the Flija. The Flija Serving Officer counts the Flija consumers, while the Flija Reporting Officer counts the incoming reports. After all Flija is consumed, the Officers tell the participants how many of them have reported an unusual Flija in relation to the total Flija consumed. They also explain how this game relates to corruption: Reporting corruption is so uncommon in Central Asia and Europe for 30% of the population fear retaliation.

Tasteception

15 Mar
March 15, 2017

Vigan Hoxha

This data dish is a play on perception and a live poll, based on UNDP Kosovo’s “Public Pulse” report. Each year, citizens are asked to share their experiences when they were faced with corruption at local and central institutions and to share their thoughts on the biggest problems that they face. There is much talk that “perception overstates the problem of corruption”, that it’s “all in people’s heads”. This dish puts the data in people’s mouths.
There are three soups. Each represents one of the three biggest problems in Kosovo according to Kosovars: Unemployment comes first, corruption second and economic development third. In three cauliflower soups the amount of chilli differs. When the soup is served, people are asked what is their perception of the dishes. Do they taste the difference and which one is the most spiced? Or in other words: Which one represents the biggest problem? Trust your taste buds and put your spoon next to that bowl!

Reports on the Rise

15 Mar
March 15, 2017

Vigan Hoxha

This data dish transforms a popular local dish of rice and milk mixture (“Sytlijash” of Ottoman origin) into a data dish based on the number of corruption reports that the Kallxo.com reporting platform receives from citizens. The rice and milk mixture’s height represents the number of reports received in the past two years. The broken crust – made up of caramelized sugar – represents corruption. So the higher the number of citizen reports, the more the crust of corruption is broken into smaller pieces. The more people report corruption, the lesser the chances that people will engage in corrupt practices theoretically. And did you get the wordplay in the title?

Transparency Sandwiches

15 Mar
March 15, 2017

Thomas Levine, Elona Shatri

How open are the ministries in Kosovo, when citizen request information? Based on a transparency report from the KDI (Kosovan Democratic Institute), data chefs Elona Shatri and Thomas Levine produced a series of sandwiches, where the visibility of different ingredients indicates the openness of each each ministry with respect to Budget (chicken), auctions (salad) and procurement (tomato). Compare the fully closed sandwich for the Ministry of Environmental and Spatial Planning with the surprisingly open Ministry of Finances!