Archive for: * Featured *

Zuckerberg Pops

29 Jan
January 29, 2015

Klaas Glenewinkel and Jess Smee

The image above shows a visualisation of the percentage of internet users that use Facebook. The amount of Facebook users is visualised by the amount of blue sprinkles.
In Tunisia, the number of Facebook users is very high, whereas in Egypt it is much lower. These numbers makes us wonder whether there is a connection between the use of Facebook and the results of the Arab Spring. In Tunisia, the Arab Spring had a sustainable impact on the democratisation of society, very much in contrast to the situation in Egypt, which fell back under totalitarian leadership.

[Data Source]

Tweeting Tabouleh

29 Jan
January 29, 2015

Anja Wollenberg, Maral Jekta

Tweeting Tabouleh

Requiem for Science

16 Jun
June 16, 2014

Antonija Kuzmanic

This fascinating dish provides a multi-layered representation of a simple, but striking statistic: science funding in Spain was cut by a staggering 34% over the last few years.

Antonija Kuzmanic decided to represent this huge drop in funding with two almond cakes (Tortas de Santiago) — based on the same recipe, but prepared differently. The first one was made applying “scientific” techniques (foaming the dough with a siphon and microwaving it for 45 seconds), representing the situation before the cuts, while the second cake represents today.

It was baked in the traditional way without advanced techniques, and turned out considerably drier and denser. In addition, the amount of sugar used in the cakes is proportional to the different amounts of funding in science, resulting in a much less enjoyable experience for the “non-science” cake.

First Date Noodles

16 Jun
June 16, 2014

Domestic Data Streamers

This is the opening dish in a series of three, all investigating the sex life of young people in Barcelona. This one shows, who will have sex on the first date. 86 per cent of men, and 59 per cent of women, as it turned out in a spontaneous and informal survey among the cooks’ Facebook friends. The messy “noodle ball” represents that part of the data set, and the color indicates the people’s gender. The abstinent men and women are represented by the straight noodles not touching each other. See also In & Out and Sugarsm.

Emigration Fish

16 Jun
June 16, 2014

Samuel Boucher & Jahn Schlosser

A wonderful dish representing the emigration of young people from Spain. The one side of the fried dorada represents Spain, all in red and yellow, while the second half shows where Spanish people emigrate. Each piece represents in size the amount of Spanish immigrants to the six most favoured countries, and is prepared in a way that’s typical for the respective country: battered fish for the UK, with a wine sauce á la Française for France, cooked in beer and parsley for Germany. The US fish is fried in bacon fat, while the Ecuadorian fish is prepared as a ceviche. In your mind, tasting each fish preparation really takes you to that country.

Unemployed Pan con Tomate

16 Jun
June 16, 2014

Samuel Boucher & Jahn Schlosser

This edible area chart shows the huge increase in youth unemployment in a traditional “Pan con Tomate” (bread with tomatoes). With unemployment rising over time, the amount of tomato decreases, making the bread hard to eat, as the garlic overpowers. As a consequence of the increase in unemployment — in 2013, over 50 per cent of people under 25 couldn’t find a job in Spain — many young people emigrate.

Spiced foreigners between pasta

16 Sep
September 16, 2012

Symeon Delikaris-Manias

A lasagna that represents the ethnic mix in Finland with a spice gradient from 1990 on one side of the lasagna to 2011 on the other side of the lasagna. You can essentially taste how immigration spiced up Finland!

Kippis!

16 Sep
September 16, 2012

This map of Finland shows the differences in alcohol consumption across Finland. Each region is symbolized with typical food from the area; the amount of wine, beer, and spirits consumed (compared to the average) is hown in the fill height of three glasses per region.

Lakmoussetikka

16 Sep
September 16, 2012

Nathalie Aubret & Melinda Sipos

This dessert represents the amount of berries picked in the very thin layer of blueberry on top, as compared to all the berries that could be picked, but are left in Finnish forest – represented in the amount of mousse on bottom.

Isn’t it crazy that we buy blueberries from Poland in the supermarket, while we could just go to the forest to pick them?