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Soufflée au KEK

15 Mar
March 15, 2017

Thomas Levine, Elona Shatri

Kosovo runs on two power plants, of which the oldest, Kosovo A Power Station, is said to be the worst single-point source of pollution in Europe. Plans to build a cleaner and more efficient power plant date back to the early 2000s, but they have been altered along the way and construction was postponed constantly. Like its predecessors, the new plant, Kosovo C, would burn lignite, coal’s crumbly brown, toxic, poor cousin. For cleaner energy has gotten so much cheaper in recent years, building an eventually not-so-efficient and dirty new power plant instead of wind farms and solar panels seems absurd. The whole case is an unfathomable boscage of private and public interest, in which the soon-to-be-privatised Kosovo Energy Corporation (KEK), politicians, investors and the World Bank are entangled.

Soufflée au KEK depicts the absurdity of the situation in a data dish and a performance.

Three chocolate soufflées together with the three coffees represent the three power plants, existing Kosovo A and B and the future plant C.

The size of the soufflées is proportional to the power plants’ electricity production – and well, there is some difference, but not so much in the end.

The chocolate inside is proportional to the dust pollution, and that varies dramatically, since plant A is a massive polluter. But because they all run on coal or lignite, they all pollute – which you can see from the smoke produced by burning tea on the soufflées’ top.

The coffee-making performance follows a strict script, in which the two performers make contradictory statements about the three power plants.

Tasteception

15 Mar
March 15, 2017

Vigan Hoxha

This data dish is a play on perception and a live poll, based on UNDP Kosovo’s “Public Pulse” report. Each year, citizens are asked to share their experiences when they were faced with corruption at local and central institutions and to share their thoughts on the biggest problems that they face. There is much talk that “perception overstates the problem of corruption”, that it’s “all in people’s heads”. This dish puts the data in people’s mouths.
There are three soups. Each represents one of the three biggest problems in Kosovo according to Kosovars: Unemployment comes first, corruption second and economic development third. In three cauliflower soups the amount of chilli differs. When the soup is served, people are asked what is their perception of the dishes. Do they taste the difference and which one is the most spiced? Or in other words: Which one represents the biggest problem? Trust your taste buds and put your spoon next to that bowl!

Eating the distance

06 Jul
July 6, 2016

Jessie Richards, Ben Houge and Joshua Rosenstock

“Eating the distance” presents a sequence of fruit crudites — four dishes that represent the distance food travels to get to us, as well as the varying complexity of food processing.

From a locally sourced Gin Rickey (only 80 miles of total travel distance for the ingredients) we progress to Skyr yoghurt with honey, strawberry and mint (400 miles) to a creamy mango-pistachio bite (7,000 miles) to a coconut tapioca pudding with pineapple chunks and coconut cream, wrapped in a banana leaf cone amounting in a total of 21,000 miles travelled.

In the presentation, the dishes are spread out in the room, in proportional distance to the “food miles” travelled.

Inequal Exposure

06 Jul
July 6, 2016

Ben Snell, Steven Braun, Ann McDonald

This Bostonian layered rice dish makes a critical statement about the class-based disparities in relation to densities of hazardous waste sites in Massachusetts. Basically it shows that the poorer you are, the more you are exposed to pollution. Hence, the black rice increases with the density of waste sites, with a dramatical looking sewage of waste (pesto) of the upper layer into the soil (white rice). Finally, the amount of scrambled egg on top indicates the income group.

High sKale

19 May
May 19, 2016

Saskia Burghardt, Saibot Karlsson

Smoked kale is the key ingredient of these dishes, that are based on data about cannabis consumption by 15 to 16-year old kids in England (35% have tried cannabis), Italy (24%) and Sweden (8%). Three big joints are made with a filling representing the different countries: fish and chips, risotto, and pickled herring with boiled potatoes. To each of the fillings smoked kale is added according to the amount of pot smokers.

Food transit time

19 May
May 19, 2016

Didi Lehnhausen

Classic humus enriched with beetroot for a better understanding of your body

This dish both visualises data and enables its consumer to find out about the time that his/her body needs to digest and excrete the food.

The 8.8 metre line of humus represents the average length of a human intestine. Before eating the humus, each participant is provided with a plastic cup for collecting urine. The participant should write his/her name and the time of intake on the cup. When the urine turns reddish, the humus has been fully digested and the participant should note his/her personal time for digestion on the cup.

Atomic shots

19 May
May 19, 2016

Roldan Descamps, Jil Theunissen, François Chasseur

These gin tonics fume and glow in the dark. No wonder, considering what they represent: nuclear accidents at the four Belgium nuclear power plants and the amount of people living within their 30 kms zones. 30 kms was the radius defined as the evacuation zone around the nuclear power plant in Fukushima. Each gram of gel globules in the shots corresponds to 100,000 people living in these zones. Currently, there is a hot debate in Belgium and its neighbouring states about switching two of Belgium’s antiquated nuclear plants off.

Noble du chocolat

19 May
May 19, 2016

Roldan Descamps, Jil Theunissen, François Chasseur

Statistics can be eye-openers, but they also can be absurd or simply deceptive. The statistically significant correlation between chocolate consumption and the number of Nobel prize winners in selected countries served as the inspiration for “Nobel du chocolat”. The desserts vary in in complexity, their country-specific ingredients and the amount of chocolate used.

Energy Mix

14 Jan
January 14, 2016

Only 15% of the energy consumed in Switzerland comes from renewable sources.

Onionland

14 Jan
January 14, 2016

Sabine Himmelsbach

How much do people in different countries use Tor for anonymized internet access? This data dish visualizes levels of encryption in onion layers.