Archive for: Boston workshop

Sea Change

06 Jul
July 6, 2016

Lynn Cherny and Alex Dorsk

Many factors affect fish populations in the Gulf of Maine, but certainly, water temperature has a major impact on the populations of cod and lobster. These sea food entrees create awareness for the rising lobster population and the declining cod population in the Gulf over the past 16 years.

A ceviche, a cold dish, represents the ratio of both dwellers in 2000. You can experience the effects of rising water temperature in the two luke warm sous-vide morsels representing data from 2007. And eventually, in the 2014 preparation – yes, it’s getting hot – both the lobster and the cod are broiled and served with smoked paprika and burned fins.

Eating the distance

06 Jul
July 6, 2016

Jessie Richards, Ben Houge and Joshua Rosenstock

“Eating the distance” presents a sequence of fruit crudites — four dishes that represent the distance food travels to get to us, as well as the varying complexity of food processing.

From a locally sourced Gin Rickey (only 80 miles of total travel distance for the ingredients) we progress to Skyr yoghurt with honey, strawberry and mint (400 miles) to a creamy mango-pistachio bite (7,000 miles) to a coconut tapioca pudding with pineapple chunks and coconut cream, wrapped in a banana leaf cone amounting in a total of 21,000 miles travelled.

In the presentation, the dishes are spread out in the room, in proportional distance to the “food miles” travelled.

Inequal Exposure

06 Jul
July 6, 2016

Ben Snell, Steven Braun, Ann McDonald

This Bostonian layered rice dish makes a critical statement about the class-based disparities in relation to densities of hazardous waste sites in Massachusetts. Basically it shows that the poorer you are, the more you are exposed to pollution. Hence, the black rice increases with the density of waste sites, with a dramatical looking sewage of waste (pesto) of the upper layer into the soil (white rice). Finally, the amount of scrambled egg on top indicates the income group.

Liquid assets

06 Jul
July 6, 2016

Boon and Caro Sheridan

The recent ‘The Color of Wealth in Boston’ report revealed the difference in access to liquid assets in the Boston population. The research inspired Boon and Carol to produce six Daiquiri variations. The different rums used indicate the ethnic group/origin and their amount of liquid assets.

In many cultures, alcohol is made from sugarcane byproducts. In order to produce rum, sugarcane needs to ferment, which means it must be put aside and not touched for some time, just like people do with their financial assets.

The cocktails should be served in ice spheres of different thickness (thick=most assets = more protected; thin= least assets = least protected) which must be cracked before drinking. The performative action of slashing the ice reminds us that for those people with little liquid assets a simple event such as an accident or loss or employment means financial hazard.

A million new friends

06 Jul
July 6, 2016

Skye Moret, Alberta Chu

From above, all three Vodka jello shots look almost the same. A non-transparent light blue layer doesn’t allow to see what’s under the surface — just as the water in the Boston Harbour looks like throughout the year. But independent of when in the year you take a bath, you will always make contact with more faecal coliform bacteria than considered harmless. In proportion to the average amount of coliform bacteria in summer and winter, lemon zest is added to the jellos. Use blueberries for the harbour rocks and add a plastic wale to the summer version and candy cane and powder sugar to give an impression of snow and slush in the winter version. The third glass shows the max amount of coliform within the recreational limits.

 

Deconstructed Food Miles Smoothie

06 Jul
July 6, 2016

Joshua Pablo Rosenstock

In this smoothie drinking performance, each of the fruit purees must be consumed simultaneously through straws whose length corresponds to the distance the food has travelled to Boston. The blueberries imported from Canada result in a 7.5 inches straw; the strawberries from Peru in a 27.75 inches straw; pineapple from Costa Rica in a 31 inches straw; Greek peaches in a 32.7 inches straw; Turkish Cherries in a 35.7 inches straw. And finally, the Chilean Blackberries travelled the longest way resulting in a 37.5 inches straw.