Archive for: Barcelona Workshop

Requiem for Science

16 Jun
June 16, 2014

Antonija Kuzmanic

This fascinating dish provides a multi-layered representation of a simple, but striking statistic: science funding in Spain was cut by a staggering 34% over the last few years.

Antonija Kuzmanic decided to represent this huge drop in funding with two almond cakes (Tortas de Santiago) — based on the same recipe, but prepared differently. The first one was made applying “scientific” techniques (foaming the dough with a siphon and microwaving it for 45 seconds), representing the situation before the cuts, while the second cake represents today.

It was baked in the traditional way without advanced techniques, and turned out considerably drier and denser. In addition, the amount of sugar used in the cakes is proportional to the different amounts of funding in science, resulting in a much less enjoyable experience for the “non-science” cake.

Tortilla Feliz Catalana

16 Jun
June 16, 2014

Dorit Mielke & Nora Lidgus

A decomposed tortilla represents the state of well-being in Spain. Based on data from the Better Life Index, each component of these layered tortillas represents a topic: community = peppers, life satisfaction = asparagus, jobs = potatoes, and education = onions. One half of the “tortilla tower” represents Spain’s scores in these topics, while the other half reveals what people actually find important (based on the Better Life Index responses). The difference between these two statistics — for instance, people find education really important, but Spain does not fare that well in this area — becomes apparent in the different taste of the two tortillas.

Sugarsm

16 Jun
June 16, 2014

Domestic Data Streamers

After First Date Noodles and In & Out, this dish concludes a series on the sexual behavior of young people in Barcelona. Each sugar blob stands for a different technique how people reach the climax, with the amount of sugar representing its percentage of mentions in an informal survey among Facebook friends. Sweet, and psychedelic! And not so easy to make, which might be a hint regarding the subject of this creation.

In & Out

16 Jun
June 16, 2014

Domestic Data Streamers

How often do couples have sex compared to singles? This dish answers this question based on an informal survey among the cooks’ Facebook contacts. The rice paper dumplings have two different fillings: men are represented by a reduction of meat, while the ‘female’ dumplings are filled with a fish reduction –– a choice based on the Spanish way to describe sex with men and women. Whether it’s men or women in a couple or not having a partner can be deducted from the color ­­–– the lighter colors indicate the singles. The amounts of sesame and salt on top indicate the frequency of sexual encounters of the different groups.

See also First Date Noodles and Sugarsm.

First Date Noodles

16 Jun
June 16, 2014

Domestic Data Streamers

This is the opening dish in a series of three, all investigating the sex life of young people in Barcelona. This one shows, who will have sex on the first date. 86 per cent of men, and 59 per cent of women, as it turned out in a spontaneous and informal survey among the cooks’ Facebook friends. The messy “noodle ball” represents that part of the data set, and the color indicates the people’s gender. The abstinent men and women are represented by the straight noodles not touching each other. See also In & Out and Sugarsm.

The wasted dish

16 Jun
June 16, 2014

Pilar Talavera

This dish represents the amount of homeless people in Barcelona, comparing summer (the big loaf) and winter (the considerably smaller one). In summer, many more people don’t have shelters and live on the streets, while in winter less people literally live on the street.

Reflecting the theme of the homeless’ daily struggle for food, Pilar decided to use exclusively food waste of the other participants to create her dish. The use of the waste in the dish speaks for itself. It proves that what we usually consider waste often can be used to create tasty dishes. It also alludes to homeless people living on our garbage.

Xarxes de mel i mató

16 Jun
June 16, 2014

Wladimir Albuja Burgos

Doesn’t the internet make everything sweeter? These dishes represent the amount of internet use in – honey! Only 27.6% of people in the age group of 65-74 use internet in Spain, but 99% of the 16-24 year olds. Using a food printer, a network graphic was printed with honey on top of each portion of mató (similar to cottage cheese), representing the percentages in the amount of honey used.

Take it with a pinch of salt!

16 Jun
June 16, 2014

Yaiza Bocos Mirabella

Barcelona is a notoriously loud city, and Yaiza Bocos Mirabella decided to show this in a sequence of meals representing one of her days. Starting with a breakfast, over lunch and dinner to a glass of water at night, all dishes are placed on a string line of salt representing the constantly high noise levels of 75 decibels in her street. Noise levels over 50 decibels are said to be bad for one’s heath. Like with salt, a little noise is enriching, but too much of it is hard to ignore and ruins the most beautiful dish.

Emigration Fish

16 Jun
June 16, 2014

Samuel Boucher & Jahn Schlosser

A wonderful dish representing the emigration of young people from Spain. The one side of the fried dorada represents Spain, all in red and yellow, while the second half shows where Spanish people emigrate. Each piece represents in size the amount of Spanish immigrants to the six most favoured countries, and is prepared in a way that’s typical for the respective country: battered fish for the UK, with a wine sauce á la Française for France, cooked in beer and parsley for Germany. The US fish is fried in bacon fat, while the Ecuadorian fish is prepared as a ceviche. In your mind, tasting each fish preparation really takes you to that country.

Unemployed Pan con Tomate

16 Jun
June 16, 2014

Samuel Boucher & Jahn Schlosser

This edible area chart shows the huge increase in youth unemployment in a traditional “Pan con Tomate” (bread with tomatoes). With unemployment rising over time, the amount of tomato decreases, making the bread hard to eat, as the garlic overpowers. As a consequence of the increase in unemployment — in 2013, over 50 per cent of people under 25 couldn’t find a job in Spain — many young people emigrate.